Drama You can’t learn to act online

You can’t learn to act online

Interplay, which features an almost all-Joza Township cast, uses the Xhosa tradition of storytelling to educate one another about the benefits of the Internet, but I wish the cast would have studied acting and staging.

Khaya Kondile performing in Interplay at the NG Kerk Hall in Grahamstown on 9 July 2015, at the 2015 National Arts Festival. (Photo: CuePix/Hlumela Mkabile)

Khaya Kondile performing in Interplay at the NG Kerk Hall in Grahamstown on 9 July 2015, at the 2015 National Arts Festival. (Photo: CuePix/Hlumela Mkabile)

Based on the life of Feziwe Diko – a woman whose renowned artist husband passes away and leaves her several hundred pieces of artwork – it follows the story of Webster, who makes a living stealing from the ladies who sell artworks on the streets.

As the show develops, Nomzamo teaches them about the – benefit of the Internet or the “Win-ternet” as Feziwe calls it – to help create job opportunities for them.

Susan Hansen, who produced the play and wrote its script with Thozi Ngeju and Linda Nelani, says she was inspired to get involved when she realised how little people living in Grahamstown’s townships knew about the Internet. She resolved to create educational possibilities the community could relate to.

The show, which is clearly aimed at an isiXhosa-speaking audience, projects English captions on a screen above the stage. While this is thoughtful, it forces one to crane their neck uncomfortably. Further, the subtitles were not projected on time, which made it frustrating for everyone when people were not laughing at the same time, making it difficult to understand the dialogue.

This, combined with painfully mediocre acting and poorly-delivered dialogue, made me want to walk out.

Lesedi Ntuli
Cue student reporter

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